Spencer Walden
PRO

@swalden

I love learning everything I can, fixing things and building things :D Recently sold chocolab.com.au. Before that I worked as a UX Engineer.
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Joined December 2020

Four Thousand Weeks, by Oliver Burkeman - It's convincing me to be more patient and limit work sessions.

Pushing beyond the limits; "includes a big component of impatience about not being finished, not being productive enough, about never again finding such an ideal time’.

More about understanding how and why we live/work, which if you are bootstrapping, optimizing yourself is your startup :p

Deep Work by Cal Newport for similar reasons above.

The Practice By Seth Godin - focuses on how to do creative work.

Extreme Ownership - By Jocko Willink, an ex navy seal. This book is all about leadership, it was extremely useful when I started managed a team at my previous business. It focuses on the mentality and understanding that winning or losing comes down to the leader, and not to shift blame elsewhere. Anything by this guy is solid gold.

I think it's a great idea, even just to get more info about people.

Agree. Would be nice to get some more information about the people working on the projects on here.

For Chocolab I used sendinblue, activecampaign ect but this was for regular newsletters to 50k subscribers.

For smaller stuff and much cheaper, I've been enjoying using Mailguns API to create mailing lists and then you just send an email to an address and it sends to the mailing list. Very good for just plain text updates and very cheap.

@kimsia In regards to react, you basically decided the time investment of both mastering Django and React together is too high so you wanted a simpler frontend? is that right?

If I can go back in time I will say to my previous self

“success is a multi variate function”

If under different circumstances eg i have enough free time under no work pressures will find django and react still too much?

Will a different person with my exact circumstances come to same conclusions?

I have to be intellectually honest

Not necessarily

Out of the same honesty value was it too much for me?

Yes and for the foreseeable future as well

For what I want to accomplish do I absolutely need react? No

Hence my conclusion is highly personal to my unique circumstances and my own innate capacity

Different people may reach different conclusions.

I make no sweeping statements about django or react in and of itself.

My comment only covers the interaction of my experience with those domains plus my circumstances

I can tell you I spent a lot of money trying to be good at react close to 1500 dollars over a few years

I really tried

Thing is you don't have to completely let go of everything, you can launch and then add features later. Do you have a list of features that are done and not done? Try to remove the ones that are not done first. I personally would remove the data & analytics part to launch, and work on adding this later when you have a userbase to get feedback from on what data they would actually want/need.

I've been struggling with the same issue for a long time. Building chocolab.com.au has had be jumping from being a Chocolatier, a pick/packer, programmer, marketer, designer, manager and all the business admin that goes with it, and now balancing running it with my other projects. In the first few years the biggest mistakes I made was not treating myself as a limited resource, and not limiting the scope of what I could accomplish. Although I do have a co-founder, the same time balancing issues still occur. Echoing what @EbrahimKhalilHassen said, my first impression of "Mission Control" is that you need to narrow your use case, and build the smallest version of your concept you can (which could just be a small part of your vision). Try to off load, or simply avoid doing things that don't play to your strengths. These days if an idea will take me more than a week or two to launch initially into a useable version (thats live for other people to use), I don't build it. As the risk of burning out after a few months and never actually finishing it is not worth it.

Hey Spencer, thank you. That really resonated with me. Just the other day I heard a podcast with Seth Godin where he spoke about the fact that humans are terrible at understanding the "sunk cost" concept. And this is so true for me. I have invested a lot of time and energy into Mission Control. It will be extremely hard to a) let go of it or b) remove features and narrow the use case. To be honest, I have already reduced the use case and removed features in the past weeks. I got carried away because I was not able to keep it simple while also creating something meaningful and different.

If you have a moment and are willing to elaborate on your first impression: Would you be able to point your finger at the part that you feel I could/should remove/reduce? What should I focus on from your perspective?

Thank you!

Thing is you don't have to completely let go of everything, you can launch and then add features later. Do you have a list of features that are done and not done? Try to remove the ones that are not done first. I personally would remove the data & analytics part to launch, and work on adding this later when you have a userbase to get feedback from on what data they would actually want/need.

I actually prefer your WIP short description "Dip into the sea of open-source knowledge."

Be more specific, how exactly does it benefit a developer?

I actually prefer your WIP short description "Dip into the sea of open-source knowledge."